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George Chrousos | Greek Scientist | The 138K Cited Professor

Updated: May 9

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George Papadellis | SG Head


George P. Chrousos, chairman (and professor) of the Department of Pediatrics at the Athens University Medical School, is one of the 250 most prominent clinical investigators in the world, the highest cited clinical pediatrician and endocrinologist in the world (according to the ISI) and the 37th most cited scientist in the world.

George Chrousos

Photo by: in the public domain | Wikimedia Commons


Chroussos has been the director of the Pediatric Endocrinology Section and Training Program and the chief of the Pediatric and Reproductive Endocrinology Branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute of Health (NIH). He is a clinical professor of Pediatrics, Physiology and Biophysics at Georgetown University Medical School and a distinguished visiting scientist, NICHD, NIH. He was the first general director of the Foundation of Biomedical Research of the Academy of Athens.


Chrousos George holds the UNESCO Chair on Adolescent Health Care and has held the John Kluge Chair in Technology and Society, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He has authored more than 1.100 scientific publications, he has edited 29 books and his work has been cited over 138.000 times.


Chrousos research was focused on the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and has extensively studied the neuroendocrine alterations associated with mood disorders, sleep, pain perception, and immune function (particularly the Cushing's syndrome, the Addison's disease, the congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and the physiologic and molecular mechanisms of stress. Early in his career, he described in the Journal of Clinical Investigation the Glucocorticoid Resistance Syndrome, widely known as the Chrousos Syndrome, the rare genetic disease of the glucocorticoid receptor that causes the Chrousos Syndrome Symptoms: hypertension and hyperandrogenism in children and adults.

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